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The Word For Today

Learning to lead 3



'Correct, rebuke and encourage.' 2 Timothy 4:2 NIV

When you crave acceptance and approval, you end up being controlled by those you're supposed to lead. Paul recognised this. That's why he instructed Titus: 'Teach...and encourage your people...correcting them when necessary as one who has every right to do so. Don't let anyone think that what you say is not important' (Titus 2:15 TLB). Afraid of causing upheaval in the ranks, insecure leaders agonise over decisions and assume responsibility for other people's emotional reactions. They don't realise that when you're doing what you should be doing and others don't agree, that's their problem, unless you make it yours.A mature leader deals with disappointment and keeps a good attitude; they're willing to face the music even when they don't like the tune. Think: When you warn your children about putting their hand on a hot stove, it's not your responsibility to make them enjoy hearing it, right? Hopefully, as they mature they'll understand. But the truth is, some people won't like hearing the word 'no' regardless of how old they get! But we all need to hear it from time to time; otherwise, we'll never be happy with anything other than getting our own way - and that means getting nowhere, or getting into trouble.Paul, who was training Timothy for leadership, told him, 'Correct, rebuke and encourage - with great patience and careful instruction.' Correct people when they're wrong, rebuke them when they're stubborn, encourage them when they struggle, be patient as they learn and grow, and make sure your instructions are clear and understandable. That's what good leaders do - and the only way you learn it is by doing it.

Soulfood: Is 8-11, John 5:16-30, Ps 85, Prov 27:20-22

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Soulfood: Lev 8-10, Luke 1:39-56, Ps 42:1-5, Prov 1:20-23

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Learning to lead 1



'You cannot handle it alone.' Exodus 18:18 NIV

President Theodore Roosevelt once said, 'The best executive is the one who has sense enough to pick good men to do what he wants done, and self-restraint to keep from meddling with them while they do it.' Bottom line: Unless you learn to delegate, your leadership will deteriorate and your vision will stagnate.

In Exodus, Moses was wearing himself out physically, emotionally and spiritually trying to keep up with the demands of two million Israelites and be 'the answer man' for every problem. That's when his father-in-law told him, 'You cannot handle it alone. Listen...to me and I will give you some advice' (Exodus 18:18-19 NIV). It takes wisdom, maturity, and humility to ask for help. And it's a sign of strength, not weakness. That's hard to come to terms with, for those of us who take pride in our ability to 'do it all.' The truth is, what Moses was doing was neither good for him nor the people depending on him. As a leader, it's easy to overestimate your own importance and competence. That's why Paul cautions, '[Don't] think you are better than you really are. Use good sense' (Romans 12:3 CEV).

God has placed people around you who have certain gifts and talents. When you recognise and involve these people, they're fulfilled and the job gets done right. God created us to be interdependent, not independent. Delegating authority to the right people strengthened Moses for the task of leading as God intended. When you try to be 'all things to all people,' you end up frustrated. You're not called to do it all, but to get it done through others. That's what leadership is about.

Soulfood: Is 4-7, John 5:1-15, Ps 126, Prov 27:17-19

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